Young woman comforting her crying best friend. Depressed girl covering face with hands and her girlfriend consoling and care about her. Help and support concept.

  1. There is no right or wrong way to grieve. Some people need to distract themselves with work or hobbies. Others need to take time and space to be alone.
  2. There is no universal timeline for grief. Try not to put expectations on yourself about when you “should” stop grieving.
  3. Accept that grief can trigger many emotions. Acknowledge whatever you are feeling. Grief can appear as sadness, anger, shock, guilt, relief, loneliness and so much more.
  4. Take care of yourself physically, so you can take care of yourself emotionally. Sometimes our basic needs are most neglected as we grieve. Keep nutritious snacks out in plain sight so you don’t forget to eat. Prioritize sleep and make sure to move and stretch your body.
  5. Practice self-compassion. Release all expectations on how you think you “SHOULD” feel.
  6. The initial grieving period may feel exhausting. You may even feel distracted and forgetful. Don’t set big goals. Help yourself by writing things down or asking others to help.
  7. Stay active. Exercise can help you release emotional energy in a healthy way.Young woman in therapy
  8. Grief can feel isolating. Reaching out to a support group, friend or family member can help.
  9. Plan ahead for upcoming dates that may trigger grief. Anniversaries, holidays, and birthdays may be particularly challenging. Finding a way to stay supported and mindful on these days can help.
  10. Try calming strategies. Consider deep breathing, prayer, yoga, meditation— whatever may fit for your lifestyle.
  11. Reach out to a professional if you are feeling overwhelming depression. Tele-therapy options can help you process emotions from the comfort of home.
New York Project Hope

Emotional Support Helpline

Talk to a crisis counselor:

Call: 1-844-863-9314

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8am-10pm / 7 days

Young woman comforting her crying best friend.
  1. There is no right or wrong way to grieve. Some people need to distract themselves with work or hobbies. Others need to take time and space to be alone.
  2. There is no universal timeline for grief. Try not to put expectations on yourself about when you “should” stop grieving.
  3. Accept that grief can trigger many emotions. Acknowledge whatever you are feeling. Grief can appear as sadness, anger, shock, guilt, relief, loneliness and so much more.
  4. Take care of yourself physically, so you can take care of yourself emotionally. Sometimes our basic needs are most neglected as we grieve. Keep nutritious snacks out in plain sight so you don’t forget to eat. Prioritize sleep and make sure to move and stretch your body.
  5. Practice self-compassion. Release all expectations on how you think you “SHOULD” feel.
  6. The initial grieving period may feel exhausting. You may even feel distracted and forgetful. Don’t set big goals. Help yourself by writing things down or asking others to help.
  7. Stay active. Exercise can help you release emotional energy in a healthy way.
  8. Grief can feel isolating. Reaching out to a support group, friend or family member can help.
  9. Plan ahead for upcoming dates that may trigger grief. Anniversaries, holidays, and birthdays may be particularly challenging. Finding a way to stay supported and mindful on these days can help.
  10. Try calming strategies. Consider deep breathing, prayer, yoga, meditation— whatever may fit for your lifestyle.
  11. Reach out to a professional if you are feeling overwhelming depression. Tele-therapy options can help you process emotions from the comfort of home.